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  • Lighting Tutorials

    Here are a couple of really good lighting tutorials,




  • #2
    Very long winded GJ but also very informative. Thanks for sharing.

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    • #3
      If you are looking for some inspiration for some product shots, have a look at this.
      I thought it looked great when I first saw it, I bought a set of flash gels so I could try it, but just haven't got around to it yet.

      http://www.diyphotography.net/shoot-...el-bokeh-wall/

      http://www.diyphotography.net/el-bokeh-wall/
      Cheers, Brad.

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    • #4
      I watched both videos last evening and must say I was very disappointed.

      If the intention was to learn how to take good portraits using flash, there are many videos available which are far better than this. As Isaac said, it does contain some good information, but unfortunately this is offest by poor technique and the end result is a very poor portrait.

      The general approach to 3 light portrait photography as practiced by most professional photographersand experienced teachers is for a Key light close to the subject at about 45degrees to a line from the camera to the subject. Approximately where he placed the big softbox. The next light is a Fill light to reduce the shadows cast by the Key light - this is normally on the opposite side to the Key light, very close to a line from the camera to the subject, and approximately twice as far away from the subject as the Key light. The third light is the Accent light which is typical placed behind the subject (between the subject and background and more often slightly to one side) and angled down to provide a highlight to the hair and shoulders and separation between the subject and background.

      The presenter ignored the fill light and the accent light and the result is seen in his images in a portrait with excessive shadow on one side of the face (generally considered a no-no for portraits of ladies) and more obtrusive, very dark shadows under the eyes, nose and on the neck under the jaw line. Rather than applying the light from the two flashlights behind the subject to control the shadows on the face, he concentrated on getting even illumination of the background. As he showed in the last few minutes of the second video, tonal variations on the background are easily handled in post processing on the computer.

      In summary, there are much better tutorials available and you have better things to do with an hour of your time.
      Last edited by oldgreybeard; 9th August 2017, 04:43 PM.

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      • #5
        All really informative and I'm sure we can all learn something from it that we can put to good use. Thanks GJ, Ironwood and OGB. Much appreciated.
        This is for Grumpy John
        Click image for larger version

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        • Grumpy John
          Grumpy John commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks Isac, I have several of these. They're somewhere in the third draw in the kitchen.

        • Ironwood
          Ironwood commented
          Editing a comment
          I have a cupboard full of these in my shed as well, but thanks Isac another one will come in handy one day

        • Isac
          Isac commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks Guys! I have quite a collection myself and decided to share one with you.
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