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  • Info panel in Infinity Photo-editing software

    I was demonstrating a photoshop technique to a couple of guys yesterday and displayed the 'info' panel (see attached image). One of the guys is considering purchasing Infinity and wants to know if such a panel exists in Infinity and if so how to access it. Can anyone provide the answer, please?

    Click image for larger version

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    Importantly can the LAB values be displayed? Do the values in the info panel update in realtime as the cursor is moved around the image?

    Many thanks

    Bob
    Last edited by oldgreybeard; 15th December 2017, 11:07 AM.

  • #2
    If you mean "Affinity" Bob, according to this it is possible to do it. https://forum.affinity.serif.com/ind...-in-info-pane/

    I can't get my display to do it though, will have a play with it when I have some spare time.
    Cheers, Brad.

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    • #3
      Thanks Brad, my typing skills have caught me out again. Sounds as though it may be able to display LAB values - I would appreciate it if you can check it for us.

      Cheers,
      Bob

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      • #4
        I had a bit of a play this morning, I couldn't get the same info panel as in that link I posted above in the parts of Affinity that I normally use ( I am pretty basic with it ).
        But if you go into the "Tone Mapping Persona " it does have the info panel there that you can select for LAB values, and it does display the values of the pixel under the curser as you have asked for.
        They are all at 0, because my curser wasn't over the image when I took the screenshot.

        Click image for larger version

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        Cheers, Brad.

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        • #5
          There is a new Affinity Photo workbook that has just been released, I will buy one soon to help me become more proficient at its use.
          If your friend is going to go the Affinity route, he might consider one too.
          https://affinity.serif.com/en-gb/photo/workbook/
          Cheers, Brad.

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          • #6
            Thanks Brad, I suspect that they will ultimately buy the Affinity software but probably not for a couple of months. They are also looking at the Luminar 2018 software and the Adobe Lightroom /Photoshop subscription offer.

            Cheers

            Bob

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            • #7
              I like the Affinity Photo software, but it does lack a DAM. They have been saying there is one "coming soon" for a couple of years now.
              It is frustrating, because I have been using my now unsupported Apple Aperture software, this means I can't update my Apple OS to the latest one or I will lose Aperture and everything I have stored in there.

              Others are using Lightroom, On1, Capture 1 Pro, etc. I could bite the bullet and go with one of these, but would rather have a Serif program that integrates seamlessly with Affinity Photo.

              If you have some spare time you can read this thread on the Affinity forum, or just read the first and last page to avoid a headache.
              https://forum.affinity.serif.com/ind...gement/&page=8
              Cheers, Brad.

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              • #8
                I understand your frustration. There have been a number of discussions on this forum and many other photography forums seeking a soltion for the management , cataloging and searching of digital images stored on local computers. It is not a new problem, the same problems existed pre digital.

                Lightroom is probably the best available at this stage and I suggest for 2 simple reasons:
                1. It does the job well
                2. It provides an integrated solution from digital capture to print ot digital publication.

                Surely that is what we as photographers want and it should not be that difficult.
                Before lightroom, I used a simple MS Office database to manage my images - where were they stored and basic search criteria (tags) such as genre (portrait, landscape, nature, etc). It was cumbersome, but it solved the major problem - how to find the image you were looking for.

                Brad, I did read some of the comments from the link you provided and was amused by this comment from page 1

                Lightroom is not a photo editor but a RAW developer. It's editing tools are not up to what Photoshop offers. Affinity Photo is both a RAW developer and photo editor
                .

                I am not going to enter into a debate as to which product is best or whatever, but comments such as this do not help the cause - it is not only incorrect, but absolute rubbish. Any product with the editing tools equivalent to Lightroom will meet the 95% of needs of most non-commercial phototographers. In fact Lightroom and other similar products may well be more suitable for the average/ non-commercial photographer because they are not as complicated or complex, eg the noise reduction / sharpening capability in Lightroom is arguably as good as and easier to use than Smart Sharpen in Photosop while at the same time providing more precise control over which parts of the image are sharpened and by how much. As to Lightroom only being a RAW developer, I can edit jpeg,dng, tiff and even .psd (Photoshop) images in Lightroom. (enough free advertising)

                Some time ago, in another thread, Brad & I agreed that whether we use Photoshop, NIK software or whatever software, the important consideration was that the decision ultimately should be determined by the needs of the user. Unfortunately for the users (photographers) this sentiment does not seem to be shared by software developers. Lightroom has become (and problaby always was) a product for the commercial photograher. Many of the 'average' photographers who just want a simple solution to manage thier images soon loose interest in inputing all the metadata necessary to get the full benefit of the product. There are ways to minimise the work involved (presets on data acquisition, etc), but like most software today user manuals are either not available or only provide a how to - not a why or when to use a particular feature.

                I am currently involved in doing some beta testing on the next generation of Photosgop CC and have gained a small (very small) insight into some of the discussion behind the decisions as to what is included in the next upgrade. From what I have gleened from the discussions between beta testers, competitive advantage in terms of technical performance is #1: how can we do it faster. I can only surmise (perhaps cynically) that the reasoning is something like - Who cares - the power users. The image editors who have only 1 hour to colour correct 20 + images. Why - if the time to complete a task can be reduced the labour costs can be reduced and the profits increased. For the software developers, these are the purchasers of multiple products and volume licences - the big ticket items.

                I have probably only added to your headache, but I don't see a solution anytime soon. In fact I feel that it is more likely that others will go the same way as Aperture. The print media is declining at an alarming rate being overtaken the the digital social media and online marketing. Smart phones with the ability to upload 'selfies', etc to the social websites within a minute of capturing the image is also a significant contributor. Within a few weeks, most of these images only exist in the "cloud" - there is a diminishing demand for permanent retention of the images - hence a reduced incentive for software manufactures to develop image management software. On-line storage options have not been as well received as earlier predicted, and problems, such as the Photo Bucket debacle do not suggest that the on-line / cloud solutions will be an acceptable long term option.

                So in commenting on you concern / frustration, I find myself - rather than offering a solution - forecasting a continual decline in the popularity of photography as we know it now with a corresponding reduction in the development / upkeep of associated software tools appropriate to the needs of the non-commercial sector.

                Looking forward to comments from other members of the forum

                Bob



                Last edited by oldgreybeard; 17th December 2017, 10:47 AM.

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