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  • Mould in Lenses

    Looking at ads for lenses I see a lot mentioning "no mould". Is this a common problem and how can it be prevented. I notice some members located in the hot and humid north so I figure they would know more about this than us in the deep (or not so deep) south. In short, living in Sydney, should I lose sleep over this?

    Cheers, Gary

  • #2
    Getting fungus in your lenses is definitely not something you want. It is caused by getting condensation inside your lens, usually from rapid temperature changes.
    Google "fungus in lens" etc for more information, and ways to help prevent it. Sunlight destroys the fungus, so using your gear in the sunlight helps. Storing your gear for extended periods in camera bags etc doesn't help. Some people use those desiccant bags in with their gear .
    I bought one of these to store my camera and lenses in. Not sure why the price is sitting so high, I bought mine from this mob for under $500 delivered-
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/88L-elect...YAAMXQeKNTORme

    I got fungus in one of my Nikon lenses about 30 years ago, sent it away and got it cleaned, seemed to be OK afterwards. But the newer lenses have coatings which can be damaged by the fungus. Far better to prevent it in the first place.
    Cheers, Brad.

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    • #3
      Thanks Brad. I will be careful (especially if buying second hand lenses) and will be more careful with the gear I already have.

      Cheers, Gary

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      • #4
        For anyone who doesn't know - those bags contain Silica Gel which absorbs moisture, however they don't last forever! they need to be dried out.
        I worked in a museum and we used shed loads of the stuff to control the humidity in showcases containing sensitive items.
        We bought 'self-indicating' which had blue granules which turned pink when saturated with moisture. The granules then required drying out in an oven at about 250F until the indicators turned blue again.
        The stuff is cheap online so if you live in a high humidity climate it might be worth making up some bags to protect your kit.
        Mark

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        • #5
          I know when my drone took a crash dive into a pool of water in Palm Valley last year I was able to save the camera by placing it in a bag of rice for a couple of days. I'm not sure if rice would work in preventing mould though. You can buy moisture absorbing stuff from Bunnings, I've forgitten what it's called

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